Schwebenden

Anthroapologist, Explorer of the mundane and unknowable, Musicant, hyper-ambulatory lay about.

When Christian missionaries asked the north Teutons who or what they believed in, they received the reply which centuries previously the south Teutons — who had believed in Das Gott (neuter) — might also have given, that they believed in their power (matt) or strength (magin), a power working within them, a deity filling the religious man, an inner-worldly and inner-spiritual deity. Such an answer must have seemed to the missionaries, as it would to many present day commentators, a mere boast of power or an idolatrous presumption, while in fact it must be understood as a factual “The God” (Das Gott) corresponding to the dominans ille in nobis deus. But it is easy to understand that the missionaries, who in Christianity had accepted the extra-mundane, transcendent ideas of a “personal” God, from the Semitic peoples, were at a loss when confronted by faith in a destiny ruling within men.

Hans F. K. Günther, Religious Attitudes of the Indo-Europeans (via vandrare)

(via radical-traditionalism)

highs0ciety:

arabbara:

R.I.P. The 2976 American people that lost their lives on 9/11 and R.I.P. the 48,644 Afghan and 1,690,903 Iraqi and 35000 Pakistani people that paid the ultimate price for a crime they did not commit

this is the only september 11th post I’m reblogging

(via house-of-gnar)

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Spiritual Justice
Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith active circa 1600) Creation Date: 
Dated: early 17th century
Medium: iron, steel, copper, wood with scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
Measurements: 116.8 x 99.7 cm
Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
Provenance: probably supplied for the coronation of Charles I in 1626
The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, the escutcheons of the guard triangular and rather sharply pointed, with a steel blade, struck with the maker’s mark at the top and incised further down with a “running wolf” mark, and with a velvet-covered scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.
This sword, known as the Sword of Spritual Justice, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession. This sword is accompanied by the Sword of Temporal Justice and the Sword of Mercy (with a blunted tip). The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189.
The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched. It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Spiritual Justice

  • Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith active circa 1600) Creation Date: 
  • Dated: early 17th century
  • Medium: iron, steel, copper, wood with scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
  • Measurements: 116.8 x 99.7 cm
  • Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
  • Provenance: probably supplied for the coronation of Charles I in 1626

The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, the escutcheons of the guard triangular and rather sharply pointed, with a steel blade, struck with the maker’s mark at the top and incised further down with a “running wolf” mark, and with a velvet-covered scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.

This sword, known as the Sword of Spritual Justice, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession. This sword is accompanied by the Sword of Temporal Justice and the Sword of Mercy (with a blunted tip). The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189.

The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched. It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

house-of-gnar:

Kazakh eagle hunters|Mongolia

The Kazakhs are the descendants of Turkic, Mongolic and Indo-Iranian tribes and Huns that populated the territory between Siberia and the Black Sea. They are a semi-nomadic people and have roamed the mountains and valleys of western Mongolia with their herds since the 19th century.The ancient art of eagle hunting is one of many traditions and skills that the Kazakhs have been able to hold on to for the last decades. They rely on their clan and herds, believing in pre-Islamic cults of the sky, the ancestors, fire and the supernatural forces of good and evil spirits.

(via house-of-gnar)